In Memoriam

Manuel R. Moreno Fraginals - In Memoriam

Soy maestro y a mis alumnos me debo. Para ellos, para Cuba, sigo escribiendo: humildemente, diagnosis sin creerme jamás que realizo obras maestras, y ni siquiera creyendo que tengo en mis manos toda la verdad. Siempre pienso: hasta aqui he llegado; soy simplemente una estación de tránsito, no un punto de arribada final. Un maestro triunfa cuando los alumnos le aventajan: me interesa fundamentalmente impulsar a la generación que llegará mucho más allá que yo y superará ampliamente mis libros.

(I am a teacher and my students owe me. For them, to Cuba, I keep writing: humbly, never believing that I make masterpieces, and not even believing that I have in my hands the whole truth. I always think I have arrived here; just to a transit station and not to the final destination. A teacher succeeds when students excel him, I’m interested primarily to drive the generation that will come much further than I and widely exceed my books.)

Manuel R. Moreno Fraginals – 1989

Sidney_Mintz

 

Sidney W. Mintz
Wm. L. Straus Jr. Professor Emeritus
Department of Anthropology, Johns Hopkins University

Read more

Manuel Moreno Fraginals made an absolutely unique intellectual contribution to the study of Cuba, the Caribbean region, and the history of sugar.

Only a scholar who had successfully grasped the panorama of the Cuban sugar enterprise over a period at least two centuries long could have launched his research. Even more remarkable, however, was this understanding of how that enterprise fitted within the world picture.

What he has explained to us no one else had ever explained so well. I suspect that no one else will ever explain it better.

Sidney W. Mintz
Wm. L. Straus Jr. Professor Emeritus
Department of Anthropology
Johns Hopkins University

hklein

Herbert S. Klein
Gouveneur Morris Professor Emeritus of History
History Department, Columbia University

Read more

Obituary of Manuel R. Moreno Fraginals

With the death of the Cuban Historian Manuel Moreno Fraginals at 80 years of age this past May 2001, the profession has lost one of its unique voices. Businessman, scholar, lawyer and revolutionary, Moreno Fraginals’s career spanned a wide range of professions and countries. At the age of 22 he completed a degree in Law from the University of Havana, and a short time later studied history at the Colegio de México where he graduated in 1948. He returned to the island in 1949 and worked for a time at the Biblioteca Nacional. During this period he began publishing on national history. Of these earlier works the most outstanding is his essay on José Antonio Saco, Estudio y Bibliografía (1953). He eventually left in the early 1950s to became a businessman in Venezuela. With the triumph of Fidel Castro in 1959 he returned to Cuba and dedicated himself full time to the historical research. In the chaos of the first months of the new regime, he was able to organize semi-official expeditions to all the old plantations where he obtained their invaluable records for the national archives. Given his personality and rather independent nationalist politics, Moreno Fraginals never obtained a major position within the Cuban historical establishment, though he was able to work uninterruptedly in his major area of interest, the economic history of the island. In a period when history became part of the official state culture and the writing of manuales the prime historical activity, Moreno Fraginals went his own way doing fundamental archival research. After years of such research he finally published the first volume of his classic study, El Ingenio, in 1964. Though there was some resistance to his research, the support of Che Guevara was fundamental in getting his work published. He always told the story of Che Guevarra, who when challenged about why Fraginals was using supposedly a non-marxian methods to do his work, pulled out his North American made pistol and said that if this product of yanque manufacture could be used to oppose his enemies it was a good instrument no matter who made it. With the publication of El Ingenio, the most important economic study of the rise and functioning of the sugar estate in 19th century Cuba, Moreno Fraginals archived international fame. He was soon being invited to lecture in universities in Europe and North America and always obtained a major following wherever he went, as he was an extraordinary charismatic lecturer. In the following years he worked steadily on completing his monumental work, whose last two volumes appeared in 1978. For the next several decades he worked on supplementing his monumental study with additional materials. With myself and Stanley Engerman he published his complete set of slave prices (1983). In 1974 appeared his El token acucarero and there followed numerous articles on slavery and the slave labor force, some of which appeared in his his recent book La historia como arma y otros estudios sobre esclavos, ingenios y plantaciones (1999). By the late 1980s he began to turn his attention to the period of the Cuban Wars of independence. Because of his long periods of residence in Spain, he was particularly interested in the 19th century Spanish experience on the island. The result of this research were two recent books: Guerra, migración y muerte (1993) and Cuba/España. España/Cuba. Historia Comun (1995). There is little question that the work and ideas of Moreno Fraginals have come to dominate the economic history of Cuba. El Ingenio remains the point of departure for anyone studying the economy and society of the island and has inspired a host of works on this vital theme. Though he left Cuba in 1994, Moreno Fraginals remained active in historical research and a defender of national culture until his untimely death.

Herbert S. Klein
Professor of History
History Department
Columbia University

engerman_stan

Stanley Engerman
John Munro Professor of Economics
Professor of Economics and Professor of History
Department of Economics
University of Rochester, NY

Read more

My first contact with Moreno came from reading The Sugarmill, the English-language translation of the first edition of El Ingenio. These works were the primary sources for understanding sugar and slavery in Cuba for many American scholars, and they have received many citations and much discussion, as they greatly deserved. Moreno’s has been the most influential interpretation of slavery in Cuba, and his work has been important in all studies of comporative slavery in the Americas. Moreno visited with me twice in Rochester, and our discussions led to an article in the American Historical Review with Herbert Klein, examining the prices of slaves in a plantation document from his private collection. Memorable about his visits were not just the valued and pleasant discussions, but Moreno’s demonstration of another skill in which I was lacking. On returning from the airport the tail pipe of my ancient car fell off, and while I was rather flustered Moreno hopped out, twisted a clothing hanger, crawled under the car, and re-attached everything such that it no longer was to be a problem. Thus, in addition to admiration of his knowledge, and his historical and economic skills, I learned that there was much more that he had succeeded at. I was also invited to an SSRC conference in Santo Domingo, which led to a book that he and I, with Frank Moya Pons, jointly edited. The essays were on slavery and its aftermath in the Spanish-speaking Caribbean, and this volume has been well-reviewed and frequently cited. Frank and I learned much from Moreno and benefited greatly from his knowledge in the editing. There were several subsequent meetings- one in Washington airport, another in Havana at the meeting of the Association of Caribbean Historians, at which he presented a paper on slave manumissions. My memories of Moreno are most fond and respectful, for his scholarship, his graciousness, and pleasantness in conversation (despite my difficulties with foreign languages), and, also, for his skills as an automobile mechanic.

Stanley Engerman
Professor
Department of History
University of Rochester, NY

CarlosAlbertoMontaner

Carlos Alberto Montaner
Chairman of the Cuban Liberal Union
Vice-Chairman of the International Liberal
University Professor, Writer, Columnist, Madrid, Spain

Read more

La mejor manera de entender a Cuba, su historia, su gente, es por medio de la obra de Moreno Fraginals. Pocos historiadores cubanos han sido tan penetrantes. Probablemente ninguno ha tenido su capacidad de síntesis y su prosa precisa y seductora. Lo conocí cuando se exilió, y fue en nuestra oficina de Miami, en un local de la Unión Liberal Cubana, donde dictó su primera conferencia frontalmente anticastrista. Esas palabras las grabamos y de diversas maneras las hicimos llegar al pueblo cubano. Estoy seguro de que la voz de Moreno Fraginals, sus argumentos y su inteligencia sirvieron para despertar a mucha gente dentro de la Isla. Por eso, por su trato agradable, y por el valor enorme de su obra, guardo por él una inmensa admiración.

Carlos Alberto Montaner
Chairman of the Cuban Liberal Union
Vice-Chairman of the International Liberal
University Professor, Writer, Columnist
Madrid, Spain

JoseMoreno

 

José Joaquin Moreno Masó
M.S. Historiador
Barcelona, España

Read more

Cuba/España España/Cuba historia común

Se supone que para un historiador redactar una pequeña reseña sobre un libro es tarea fácil y más si éste es de historia. Sin embargo, un parentesco entre el autor del libro y quien la escribe puede resultar embarazoso y motivar una pérdida de objetividad en el análisis. En vista de ello, cuando mi amigo Carlos Estefanía me solicitó la reseña, estuve a punto de rechazar. Acabé aceptando porque por primera vez alguien me sugería escribir algo sobre un libro de mi padre; a quien amo profundamente por el parentesco natural que nos une, pero admiro y respeto también como historiador. Además, el hecho de haber colaborado en la búsqueda de información y discusión del manuscrito original, creo me daba un cierto derecho a comentar sobre algo en lo cual había participado.

Testamento intelectual

El libro “CUBA/ESPAÑA ESPAÑA/CUBA historia común” es sin duda el testamento intelectual de Manuel Moreno Fraginals. Es un libro y perdonen la redundancia, de erudición sin erudición, de sabiduría; el balance de muchos años de investigación y praxis; de infinitas lecturas, de disconformidad con casi todo lo anterior escrito, de rebeldía; de incansable búsqueda o de mayor aproximación a la verdad histórica si es que ésta existe. En síntesis, es el resumen de toda una vida dedicada a repensar la historia. Como señala Josep Fontana en la presentación, es el producto de dos pasiones: el amor a la historia y el amor a Cuba. Dos amores que le han suscitado muy serios enfrentamientos con la jerarquía oficial y le obligan en la actualidad, una vez más, a residir en el exilio.

Fue en los años sesenta cuando Moreno Fraginals nos recordó la importancia vital que tiene la Historia como arma. Nos advirtió del peligro que representaba la divulgación de los mitos históricos en las escuelas y al pueblo en general a través de los medios de comunicación. En su lugar, sugería una nueva forma de pensar la historia. Sin dogmas, sin presiones ideológicas que maniatarán una ciencia que no es exacta, pero que resulta imprescindible para cualquier sociedad que tenga un mínimo aprecio de sí misma. No hay mayor tragedia para un pueblo que carecer de memoria histórica.

Apartado de la universidad

El escrito provocó una restricción implícita a las aulas de la Universidad de La Habana para Moreno Fraginals. Seguidamente los órganos oficiales del Estado ordenaron la redacción de una historia post-revolucionaria en la que todo ocurre y se explica según las leyes del materialismo histórico y dialéctico. Una historia horizontal, sin sobresaltos, aburrida a más no poder. Algo parecido a un cuento de hadas dónde los personajes o sujetos de la historia tienen limitado su papel a ser buenos o malos. Todo comienza con las primeras rebeliones indígenas contra la colonización española y concluye con la épica victoria de Fidel y sus hombres contra el tirano Batista. Se aprovechó para explotar los mismos mitos de siempre y crear nuevos de última generación, a los que se les corrigió cualquier aspecto negativo según las nuevas creencias. Dos ejemplos sintomáticos son el Padre Varela y José A. Echevarría: a ambos se les negó su religiosidad y del primero, muchos han venido a saber que era cura y profesor del seminario San Carlos con la visita del Papa.

Esta historia lógicamente no convence, genera duda. Para todos aquellos inconformes con la historia oficial, Moreno ha escrito éste libro. Todo aquel interesado en una visión inédita de la historia de Cuba, y digo esto sin dejarme caer en la tentación por mi admiración hacia el autor, éste libro es de lectura obligatoria. Coincido cien por cien con la presentación que del libro hace el ilustre historiador español/catalán Josep Fontana. Creo que después de ello poca cosa se puede añadir. Es un libro genial, apasionado y objetivo en el que se puede viajar por la historia de Cuba a través de los sujetos que la integran y el papel que ha correspondido a cada uno representar. Quizás su aspecto más original consiste en que sin ser una historia de la cultura cubana, resulta una retrospectiva de la historia de Cuba a través de su cultura. No se trata de una historia del pensamiento político, ni de la evolución de las ideologías; simplemente la cultura en sus relaciones con el modo de producción, con los cambios políticos, su importancia en la formación de la nación. Ello lo convierte en un libro ameno, de fácil lectura.

Se le ha criticado la ausencia de notas a pie de página. Fui yo quien lo sugirió y mi padre encontró atractiva la idea. ¿Por qué no? Mis argumentos son que no es un libro habitual de historia, ni tampoco una novela, ni un ensayo. Es un libro para todo aquel que ame a Cuba y su historia independientemente de su nivel académico. Que quien lo escriba sea el patriarca de los historiadores cubanos no quiere decir que esté predestinado para los entendidos e investigadores. Este es un error en el que solemos caer todos. Escribimos para los miembros de la tribu, pasando por alto cuestiones que para los especialistas son elementales. Los resultados, siempre son tochos de libros llenos de citas que sólo alcanzan a leer íntegramente unos cuantos, el resto, suelen conservarlo como una enciclopedia, es decir: un libro de consulta. No en vano son muchos de éstos quienes confirman la tesis de que la historia es aburrida cuando los verdaderamente aburridos son ellos. Varias investigaciones han demostrado que el 55% de los artículos publicados en prestigiosas revistas científicas no han sido citado en los próximos cinco años ni una sola vez, y en el caso particular de la historia los porcentajes ascienden a un 95%.

Con este libro Moreno Fraginals no sólo nos ha enseñado la importancia de acercar la historia a su pueblo, sino que a demostrado una continuidad con sus ideas durante todos estos años que resulta envidiable. Jamás se ha separado del marxismo pero tampoco se ha dejado encerrar por éste. Quien realice un balance desde «La historia como arma» hasta «Cuba España…» notará una continuidad en el pensamiento que nada tiene que ver con los derrotistas que confirman el fin de la historia. La historia continúa siendo para él un arma y como tal, para evitar que sea manipulada, nos la entrega bien hilvanada y a su vez fácil de digerir. Éste es a mi juicio el mayor logro que tiene este libro. Pocos historiadores disponen de tal capacidad de síntesis que les permita en unas 300 páginas resumir de forma tan amena y sabia la historia de Cuba hasta 1898. «Cuba/España…» en mi opinión, por la envergadura de su prosa, que deja la historia de Cuba al alcance de todos los que como el propio autor tienen dos pasiones: La historia y Cuba, diría que estamos ante un clásico que hará escuela a la hora de redactar historia. Consecuente con sus principios, Moreno nos deja su legado histórico para el disfrute de todos y no sólo de los academicistas. Retomando sus propias palabras de «La historia como arma» y dirigidas a aquellos que sólo han sido capaces de apreciar que el libro carece de citas les digo que «Cuba/España…» está por encima de te-escribo-la-nota-de-tu-libro para que luego tú-me-escribas-la-nota-de-mi-libro. A mi padre como historiador, gracias por éste magnifico libro.

José Joaquin Moreno Masó
Historiador.
Pineda de Mar, Barcelona, España
publicado en: cortesía de cubanuestra.

CarmeloMesaLago

Carmelo Mesa-Lago
Distinguished Professor Emeritus Economics and Latin American Studies
University of Pittsburgh
Research Scholar International Relations and Latin America
Florida International University

Read more

Manuel Moreno Fraginals was a great scholar, a courageous man and a loyal friend. I had read his masterpiece “The SugarMill” (probably the best Cuban economic history book) and was very interested in meeting him. At that time I was the Director of the Center for Latin American Studies of the University of Pittsburgh and, learning that Moreno was coming to the United States, I immediately invited him to give a lecture at Pitt. He came and gave a first-rate lecture. I was astonished at the information he had on the current state of the sugar industry in Cuba, but even more so on his frankness and criticism. This was the first time I have heard somebody coming from Cuba speaking in that open manner, and my admiration for him increased even more. After the lecture, having dinner at home, Moreno told me a wonderful story: In 1969 I had published in the United States a critical essay on the availability and reliability of Cuban statistics and, disregarding the risks, he translated my essay into Spanish and circulated it within the island. In the mid-1980s, when my work was the target of fierce criticism by Cuban officials and sympathizers abroad, who accused me of leading “Cubanology” (supposedly the US ideological offensive against Cuba), Moreno –who was in the Island–wrote me a letter giving me full support, reacting against such criticism and saying many Cubans shared his feelings. After he came permanently to the Unites States, we met several times at Florida International University and I strongly supported him for the Bacardi chair at the University of Miami (one he deserved but unfortunately never got). I saw him last time in Madrid, right before the publication of his excellent book on Cuba and Spain. He was almost blind but, when recognizing my voice, he embraced me warmly and, despite his fragility, he gave a superb lecture on his new book. Moreno never saw my dedication to him of my latest book “Market, Socialist and Mixed Economies: Comparative Policy and Performance–Chile, Cuba and Costa Rica”: ” To Manuel Moreno Fraginals, compatriot, colleague and friend, who aroused my interest in the economic history of Latin America and Cuba.” He taught and/or inspired scores of social science historians, in Cuba and abroad, who are a living tribute to his memory. I am proud to be one of them.

Carmelo Mesa-Lago
Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Economics and Latin American Studies at the University of Pittsburgh
Professor and Research Scholar on International Relations and Latin America at Florida International University

NicolasSanchezAlbornoz

 

Nicolás Sánchez-Albornoz
New York University, Emeritus

Read more

Manuel Moreno Fraginals, entre Nueva York y Madrid

Mi encuentro con Manuel Moreno Fraginals se remonta a mediados de los años setenta, ante una mesa compartida con amigos en un diminuto restaurant argentino de Mac Dougal Street, en el corazón del Greenwich Village neoyorquino. La cena terminó en nuestra casa cercana entre copas y conversaciones, mientras nuestros miembros se desentumecían de la rigidez impuesta por la estrechez del modesto lugar. Moreno venía de alguna de las conferencias a las que empezaba a acudir en los Estados Unidos. Desde entonces, las coincidencias no faltaron: una conferencia suya en el Centro Latinoamericano de mi propia universidad, New York University; su triunfo en Los Angeles, compartido con los amigos, por el premio Bancroft que la American Historical Association le otorgó por su luminoso libro El Ingenio; más pasos fugaces por Nueva York; alguna carta cruzada a través de la UNESCO y la proyección, en fin, de la película en cuyo guión intervino. En sus distintas apariciones, Manuel siempre traía un vendaval de aire fresco. Mostró una capacidad singular para romper el doble cerco que los Estados Unidos y Cuba habían tendido entre ellos. Su presencia abría una ventana sobre un mundo vedado. Su trabajo como historiador perdía insularidad y ganaba reconocimiento internacional. El Ingenio no sólo revelaba excelencia profesional. También una historia económica y social con una génesis independiente. El libro coincidía, pero no repetía el modelo de historia propuesto antes por franceses y anglosajones, ni tampoco el marxista. Las concepciones y convicciones de Moreno Fraginals plasmaron por su propio impulso en una obra clásica. El historiador que era abría también su mensaje a otros medios de comunicación, como era el cine.

El escenario de nuestros encuentros se trasladó después a España debido a una presencia creciente de ambos en ella. Yo había vuelto a poner mis pies en mi tierra al cabo de interminables años e intervenía esporádicamente allí en actividades académicas. En Manuel, por otro lado, crecía el interés por entender la intensidad de la relación entre Cuba y España. Su búsqueda dio lugar a por lo menos un par de libros conocidos. Después de inaugurado el gobierno socialista en España, coincidimos en algunas reuniones. Por ellas, las nuevas autoridades procuraban acercarse a capas de intelectuales latinoamericanos que el antiguo régimen había mantenido a distancia. Concurrimos también a encuentros en Barcelona o en Oviedo o nos vimos en visitas inesperadas en mi casa de Madrid. El último contacto con él fue en 1998 como colegas en el departamento de historia de la Florida International University, de Miami. Aquí, el gusto del reencuentro quedó empañado para mí cuando empecé a percibir el desasosiego que le embargaba y la disminución de su vigor por obra de los años. Habiéndole conocido transgresor en ideas y en la vida misma, dolía ver cómo se replegaba, acumulando problemas que lo alejaban de la vida plácida que a su edad merecía. Los años de Miami me temo que fueron duros e ingratos para él, y también lo fueron para los le conocimos con otro ánimo.

Manuel Moreno Fraginals merece un elogio pormenorizado como historiador que algún colega más cercano a los temas que trató se encuentra en mejores condiciones de hacer con autoridad profesional. La personalidad intensa, contradictoria y cálida podrá ser evocada por quienes lo han tenido más cerca que yo durante años, antes, durante y después de Cuba. Las líneas anteriores no pretenden llenar ninguno de esos huecos, sino transmitir en dos pinceladas, desde ángulos laterales de su rica existencia -Nueva York y Madrid- mi aprecio y respeto profesional y mi amistad cargada de emoción ante su ausencia.

Nicolás Sánchez-Albornoz
New York University, Emeritus

EloisaLezamaLima

Eloísa Lezama Lima 

University Professor, Miami, Florida

Read more

Manuel Moreno Fraginals: un hombre hecho para el diálogo

Manolo Moreno, un amigo de siempre, llego a nuestras vidas cuando los tres éramos muy jóvenes. Mi hermano se reunía con él para hablar de literatura y de historia en la Universidad de La Habana y el paseo del Prado. Allí acudían jovenes con inquietudes para discutir temas de altura y profundidad. Moreno Fraginals se ausentaba cuando hacia algún viaje al extranjero, pero siempre volvía a aquellas peñas que tanto le gustaban. Se caracterizaban aquellas por diálogos enriquecedores que atraían cada vez más a los que no encontraban en círculos oficiales satisfacer su insaciable curiosidad.

Vinieron los años críticos del gobierno del General Machado y el cierre de la Universidad de La Habana, después los tambaleantes gobiernos de Fulgencio Batista y las situaciones políticas cada vez más difíciles iban en aumento. Las reuniones de jóvenes se dispersaron. Pero la amistad de Manolo Moreno y de José Lezama Lima permaneció intacta.

Pasaron los años y Lezama cayo en desgracia con el régimen castrista. Visitar la casa de Lezama Lima era considerado un acto subversivo y el poeta paso a ser un enemigo del régimen, pero Moreno Fraginals siguió siendo su amigo leal; quiero dejar constancia de un recuerdo que siempre me conmoverá:

Conocedor Moreno de las dificultades de Lezama, pensó que nada más oportuno que proporcionarle unos días de sosiego en el campo y en una solución poética, lo invito a pasarse una semana en el Valle de Viñales. Manolo y su hija Beatriz irían con Lezama y su esposa a rememorar las peñas del Paseo del Prado.

En carta fechada el 20 de Octubre de 1972 me dice mi hermano:

“Te escribo desde el Hotel Los Jazmines, situado en el Mirador del Valle de Viñales, uno de los sitios mas bellos de Cuba. Las notas brillantes de color matizadas con un poco de gris. El Valle luce todo su color y su gracia esbelta. Sentirse instalado frente a el es sentirse el peso de toda la historia de Cuba, la que no se hizo, la que se quedo en posibilidad potencial y parece que va a irrumpir en un chorro de luz.”

La experiencia fue muy positiva y Lezama relataba anécdotas sobre la estancia transformándola en un viaje mítico realizado con su amigo Manolo Moreno Fraginals.

Después de muchos años conocí a Beatriz, hija de Manuel Moreno Fraginals y de Beatriz Masó, y ella me diría que su padre le había insistido en que conocer al poeta Lezama Lima era un privilegio que ella nunca olvidaría.

He querido destacar este aspecto humano de la gran sensibilidad de nuestro inolvidable historiador.

Eloísa Lezama Lima
Profesora Universitaria.
Miami, Florida

AntonioElorza

Antonio Elorza
Historiador, Ensayista y Catedrático de Ciencias Políticas
Universidad Complutense de Madrid

 

Read more

Acaba de fallecer en Miami el historiador habanero Manuel Moreno Fraginals, autor de El ingenio, una obra capital que señaló desde su aparición en 1964 el comienzo de una nueva era en la historia social y económica de la Cuba del siglo XIX. Había cumplido 80 años en septiembre pasado, transcurriendo los últimos meses de su vida en una lucha contra la muerte asistido por su esposa, Teresa Pedraza.

Su formación como historiador y economista le llevó a recorrer diversos países, entre ellos España, donde residió entre 1947 y 1949, perteneciendo al círculo de amigos de Juan Benet y Luis Martín Santos. En 1951 redactó su primer trabajo sobresaliente, José Antonio Saco. Estudio y bibliografía. Inauguró en él su preocupación por la singular gestación de la conciencia nacional cubana. De las ideas pasó a analizar las condiciones económicas que determinaron la tensión entre los primeros patriotas y la acomodación de la sacarocracia: el resultado fue El ingenio, de 1964, magnífico estudio de una economía de plantación abordado desde una conjunción del marxismo con la historia económica anglosajona.

Antes de 1959, Moreno ocupó importantes cargos empresariales en Venezuela y México, y esa experiencia le sirvió, al incorporarse a la revolución, para convertirse en consejero económico del Che Guevara. En la Cuba de Castro sostuvo una brillante carrera, cada vez más marcada por la desconfianza, hasta que en los años noventa pasó del exilio interior al efectivo en Miami. Es entonces cuando redacta el sugerente ensayo Cuba / España, España / Cuba. Historia común (Crítica, 1995). Colaboró en EL PAÍS, con una agilidad de pluma puesta de manifiesto en la réplica a Gabriel García Márquez, su último artículo.

Manuel Moreno Fraginals fue hombre de extraordinaria vitalidad, devoto del rigor, de la investigación, y en la esfera privada, del amor y de la amistad. Su trato era entrañable y su conversación, exuberante. No podremos volver a ofrecerle ese ‘agua de fuego’, la queimada, que tanto apreciaba.

Antonio Elorza
Catedrático de Ciencias Políticas
Universidad Complutense de Madrid